Sportscasting – the language of parenting

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(Photo via in pastel, Flickr Creative Commons)

When I first started this blog as a new mother, I wrote a few posts about my journey in bilingual parenting and learning the language of mothering, which for me is Spanish, my second language. Now, some three years later, I am learning a new, different kind, of language: sportscasting.

Sportscasting, or narrating, is a RIE concept developed by its founder, Magda Gerber.

In the same way that a sports announcer is trained to give an impartial, non-judgmental analysis of a tennis match or football game, parents are encouraged to sportscast, or describe, what they see when interacting with their children. Narrate, not judge. Reflect back for a child, rather than suggest or direct.

To give you a clearer idea of what sportscasting looks like in our home, I’d like to share when and why I sportscast. Continue reading

A Day in the Life: a snapshot of our daily routine

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{Photo courtesy Fernando Tomás, Flickr CC}

Lately I’m asked how the transition has been from one to two children. Besides the lack of sleep and constant nursing, our home life and daily routines have pretty much remained the same: slow, simple, and rhythmic. I’m so thankful for the wisdom of RIE founder Magda Gerber when it comes to how to structure your day with infants and young children.

While our family is still slowly easing into a daily rhythm as a unit of four, and while newborns require you to be flexible, here is a look into a day in the life of the Kratovils:

You’ll notice two characteristics to our daily life, both inspired by the writings of RIE founder, Magda Gerber (pardon the long quotations, but they’re so good!): Continue reading

Reflections from postpartum, round 2

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Friends! In case you haven’t been following me on social media you may have missed the great news: we welcomed baby boy J. to our family on June 28! (That explains my long absence around the blog. I think it’s a pretty good excuse, if you ask me.)

Already a month old, he’s packing on weight like a campeón, grunting like a little old man, and enjoying the moving shadows on the blank wall next to the changing table.

That last one: watching the light on the wall from the changing table. A fine, but important, detail about my son that I completely missed postpartum with E.

I attribute my noticing J.’s intense fascination with a blank wall – and my not shoving baby rattles and mirrors in his face – to the fact that going from one to two kids is so much easier than becoming a mom for the first time. Not easy, just easier than. Continue reading